Living in Australia or New Zealand

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The Find a Surgeon directory is a listing of active Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons who meet the requirements of the College's Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Program and have opted to be on the list. This list excludes retired or inactive Fellows.

 

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Introduction to education in Australia

Australia's education system is divided into three broad areas:

  1. Primary education (≈ ages 5 - 12)
  2. Secondary education (≈ ages 12-18)
  3. Tertiary education - Vocational Education and Training (VET) and higher education, e.g. universities)

Primary and secondary schools fall into one of three categories:

  1. Public schools - schools run by the government. Approximately 65% of children in Australia attend public schools.
  2. Independent (private) schools - these schools tend to be run by either secular educational philosophies (e.g. Montessori) or religious organisations (e.g. Protestant, Methodist etc.). Independent schools generally charge much higher fees than public schools.
  3. Catholic schools - Most Catholic schools are either run by their local parish, or diocese and their state's Catholic education department.

All schools, whether public or private, adhere to a standard set of rules and regulations that are controlled by the State or Territory governments.

For more information about Australia's education system see:

Introduction to education in New Zealand

The education system in New Zealand has three levels:

  1. Early childhood education - from birth to school entry age
  2. Primary and secondary schools - from 5-19 years of age (school is compulsory from age 6-16)
  3. Further education - vocational and higher education

School falls into one of three categories:

  1. State schools - owned and funded by the state
  2. State-integrated schools - were private and have become part of the state education system
  3. Private schools - receive some government funding but are mostly funded through charging parents school fees